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to do with china and are essential to get right to make sure the u.s. and european countries are on track. >> host: it's almost as if there's a couple of different books in one book. there is your story of the decline of the west, your story of the rise of the east and the lines are going to cross. >> guest: i think this is you can argue there's an absolute part for short talking about the west and its isolation and issues going out there and going in an amazing time and other european economies have done the unthinkable moving hundreds of millions of people out of poverty so this is going to naturally be able to question as well. >> host: let's talk about what is going wrong in the west. >> guest: first of all its important that in terms of the context of my work i talk about the unintended consequences, things that sound like a good intentions but actually yield bad outcomes and what i have done is to focus on the three key ingredients economists focus on as the drivers of economic growth and there is a capital that is basically money, labor that is the work force and then
that have nothing to do with china and essential to get right to make sure the u.s. and european countries are back on track. >> host: it's like a couple different books in one book. there's the story of the decline of the west, the rise of the east, and the basic premise of the lines are going to cross. >> guest: you can argue there's an absolute part for sure talking about the west in isolation and what the issues are going on there, and then, of course, we live in an amazing time of china and other emerging economies have done the unthinkable, moving hundreds of thousands of people out of poverty. of course, that's answering the ire relative question as well which is what i've done in the book. >> host: let's start by talking about what's going wrong in the west. >> guest: sure. first of all, i think it's really important in terms of context of my work, entalk about unintended consequences, good intentions, but yields bad outcomes. what i've done in the book is focus on the three key ingredients. those are capital, basically money, labor, which is basically the work force, and then fina
sure the u.s. and european countries are on the right track. >> host: is almost like there's a couple of different books in one book. there is your story of the decline of the west. the rise of the east, and i guess the basic premise is that the lines are going to cross. >> you can argue that there is an absolute part talking about the west and its isolation and with the issues are going on there and of course we live in an easing time when china and the other emerging economies have done the unthinkable moving these people of poverty so it is going to be in the year relevant question as well which is what i have done in the book. >> let's start by talking about what is going on in the west. >> guest: sure. i think it's important that in terms of the context of my work i talked about the unintended consequences, things that seemingly undersurface from the good intention but actually yield bad outcomes and what i've done in this book is to focus on the three key ingredients that economists focus on as the drivers of economic growth and those are capital which is basically money. lieber
] [inaudible conversations] >>> top officials from the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told senators today that the damaged nuclear power plant in japan, quote come continues to further stabilize, and that there have been no radiation readings in the u.s. the might be of concern. these remarks came before the meeting of the senate energy and natural resources committee. other speakers included officials from the energy department, the nuclear energy institute and the union of concerned scientists. this is an hour and 45 minutes. >> thank you for being here. this is a briefing. this is not a hearing has such. the reason we try to it as a briefing is so that people wouldn't have to file written testimony 72 hours ahead of time and all of that and things are changing very quickly with regard to the evolving situation that the nuclear power plant. will the committee doesn't have direct oversight on the safety of u.s. nuclear plants we do have to consider how events such as those affect the ability of the nation's nuclear fleet of 104 reactors to supply electricity, this of course the 104 react
, and these are u.s. company that is have their core base here. the good news is i think if we meet the object i haves -- objectives that we've talked about, we will stimulate clean technologies, software, hardware, all of the real disruptive technologies that we are talking about. they are global, their competitors are global, they have to be global. i think if we do the right thing, we are going to do well by exports. which is real positive. >> this is a really important point. we tend to maybe think of these things in silos. but one the president's key initiatives is doubling exports over the next five years. and, of course, that involves, you know, large companies, boeing and others. when you look at the numbers, the real way we're going to do is in increasing in the small and medium-sized enterprises. turns out that 30% of the exports are from small and medium-sized enterprises. and that's disproportionally small. and there's only 250,000 small companies that export. so if you look at the math, there's almost three million small businesses $30 million smalls. xiii of them who have traded go
worse snow? germany. a big freeze in france. in the u.s., the worst blizzards of the decades. but despite all of that, but despite of all that, their economies grew in the fourth quarter. and while our growth has worsened, theirs have improved. the german economy -- the chancellor -- the chancellor should just calm down just a little bit, mr. deputy speaker. the german economy is forecast to grow more strongly than it was last year. so is the united states. growth in the world economy has been revised up. but which is the major country downgrading its growth forecast, the united kingdom. mr. deputy speaker, it's not the wrong type of snow to blame. it's the wrong type of chancellor. it's the wrong type of chancellor in the wrong type of government with the wrong priorities for britain. mr. deputy speaker, mr. deputy speaker -- >> courtesy should be shown but can i say to everybody, the public also wants to hear what the opposition has got to say. if the cabinet members do not want to listen, then please leave the chair. some people may agree, some may disagree. the opposition
. >> i think it's also an issue for journal education. i think at least in the u.s., almost 2/3 of students in journalist school are female. >> primarily female? >> i think to some extent, it's a matter of giving them the training and incentive and also for female faculty to mentor young journalist students so they have in their head the idea that maybe they can do that. also going back to barbara's issue about skills or confidence. i think it takes a particular tenacity to be an investigative reporter. you have to be willing to stick with something to get your foot in the door. i had a student -- i used to teach investigative reporting as one the journalism courses that i taught. and my most aggressive student was a female. and even on the story assignment for class, she found out this guy wasn't going to give her an interview. she found out what time they came to work, and she was there to meet him at 7 a.m. when she arrived. she interviewed him outside of the door of his office building because he wouldn't give her an interview. i think it takes a certain amount. it can sta
benefit for civil society. and also give that many of these are u.s. based companies, is there a role for u.s. policy to promote the freedom to connect? >> one more from this side of the room. the way in the back. >> thank you. my name is john wooden. thank you all for your really excellent recitation. jackie, i was interested in your comment about more bottom-up development. others wonder if you could operationalize that with some examples. and also to ask whether the model of cooperatives and particular worker cooperatives can play a constructive role here? thank you. >> okay, let's come back to the panel, let him respond to this set of questions and then i think would probably have time for at least one more round in addition to that one. i think perhaps the most efficient way to do this is just simpler to start at the right and work our way across and let people select a question they would choose to enter. if any remain unanswered at the end you have to catch them at coffee after the meeting is over. >> so i will start with the doctor's comments, but maybe take it from low bit of
europe needs to stop being naive ought play needs to --. how big is that for the u.s.. >> following the list there's a strong sense. i give a lot of credit to our european partners. we don't have any illusions about where the european publics are and the skepticism they have about this. but it is a way forward to the political and military strategy and this is a price our partners have played a role in slovenia and bosnia offering troops for afghanistan. this is the kind of thing we look for and we see the countries in the western balkans showing the will and determination and understanding, to share the burden of responsibility. >> they thought there was a problem, they made a harsh siege. what in your view to contribute more to the military situation whenever there is one rather than -- jobs in the united states and think it can do judgment in development work? >> i don't think europe thinks that. a friend of mine and somebody i'd meet every month to talk about nato collaboration. he has a job worry about defense commitments. and looking at issues of finance and the european union
contacts or other u.s. officials' contacts with the opposition since the -- that first meeting in paris between the secretary and mr. jabril. and tell us if you are at all closer to making a decision on whether to follow the lead that france so helpfully started out a couple weeks and recognizing them a legitimate government. >> since the start of the crisis, when we saw that the council had constituted itself as some kind of temporary governing body, i and certainly members of my staff recognized that some of those people were people that we had dealt with during our tenures in libya. and so right from the start, i had been reaching out to the leaders of the council. and since that time, since the embassy was reconstituted here as i said, we had extensive dealings and contacts through our various programs, especially educational programs, with the people of the east. i had a very active public affairs section in libya, and they were always communicating with the -- with the doctors and jurists and people who, in fact, now are part of the council. so we had a good in to those people. si
with rear admiral gerald huber providing an update on the situation in libya as well as the u.s. military action against government forces there. live from the pentagon. >> we're going to amp up the volume a little bit and then we'll be ready to go. we're here at the pentagon and we're pleased to be joined today by navy rear admiral girard p. huber u.s. naval forces europe and africa, director for policy resources and strategy. admiral huber is here to give a view on an operational update be it phone link again once again as yesterday from the uss mount whitney afloat in the mediterranean. admiral huber became the director of policy resources and strategy at u.s. naval forces europe and africa in august of 2009. he is currently the chief of staff for joint task force odyssey dawn, the task force established to provide operational and tactical international response to the unrest in libya and enforcement of u.n. security council resolution 1973. with that, admiral, i'll turn things over to you. >> good afternoon, everyone. thank you, dave. thank you for the opportunity to talk about joint
. we had forums for chinese cities and mayors in chicago. we recently had u.s. eric mayors conference both in chicago, amman jordan and casablanca morocco. we had conferences for all the south america, central america and mexico canada and the united states. bringing mayors together talking about the same issues how we can work together in best practices. our global forum. we have over 28 sister cities. historically based on immigration. that was historical the wave of germans and swedes and the way eastern europeans and in turn the wave of chinese and mexicans. we had different way so historically sister cities and now we are doing business sister cities and relationship of not just our city but the metropolitan area. the relationship and how important that fits into this whole global vision for chicago in the region which is really important. revisiting china -- i will be visiting china very shortly for an almost two weeks of visiting about six or seven cities. for tourism to come to chicago and for the business community of china to make chicago the area for the center of operation
in the u.s. to congressmen and people on the left and right and journalists and think tanks and ordinary citizens and the same conclusion kept leaping out at me again and again. most americans do not realize how lucky they are you know, the political institution defined the country in many cases unique and almost all cases on usual. i'm talking about term limits, the recall mechanism, the citizens' initiative and referendum and states' rights and localism, open primaries, totally unique feature but ones that make the largest leaders answerable to the rest of us, and above all i'm talking about the direct election of almost everybody. it's human nature to take for granted that which is familiar to us, but it's these institutions growing organically growing out of the constitution that has served to keep your government more and your people free. sometimes i say this and they say there are cultural differences. we are naturally liberal people. we got away from the monarchies and the collapse is into the old world and so on. i'm afraid that explanation does not quite work. culture is and fr
administration and the u.s. said the arab countries are dominoes don't, domino pieces and they will fall one after the other. what happens is these projects fell like domino effect. [applause] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: and because some have very short memories on satellite channels, let me remind them. not everything that happens our conspiracy. because now they are ready to commence on the speech. but you, sons and daughters of this nation, your dedication to your country that you expressed day after day, and more clearly in times of crisis that you expressed it yesterday with those mass rallies in all parts of the country give me more confidence and make me steadfast, and that you work in face of the division give me hope for the future. and if you said with our soul and with our blood, sacrifice for you, the right thing to say is bashar assad sacrifices for his country. [chanting] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: and i answer you, god, syria, the people. [applause] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: i will always remain the son of this nation, will keep
at the end of the war in which benjamin franklin was one of the key u.s. and initiators. over the course of many months the five peace negotiators are meeting in paris hashing out terms of the independence of the united states. lots and lots of sticking points, but their resolve all of them until they get to one last one in the fall of 1782. and the sticking point concerns whether the u.s. is going to be made responsible for giving compensation to loyalists his property has been confiscated during the war. most of the other american negotiators are okay, but benjamin franklin will not give in on this point. he says, if you grant compensation i'm not going to sign the treaty. we have to keep fighting the war. and it anticipates his later act of property related. the two rarely ever meet again. at think these family divides do matter, and i do think what i think about most is that getting into the personalities and into the individual experience is important for explaining how history has operated. >> he said that this is the first book about the loyalist exile, refugee what to you feel sh
negotiations of the end of the war and which benjamin franklin was one of the key u.s. negotiators and over the course of many months the five peace negotiators are meeting in paris and hashing out the terms of the independence of the united states and there are lots of sticking points along the way that there was until they get to the one of last one and the kind of fall of 1782i guess it is, and the sticking point concerns whether the u.s. is going to be made responsible for giving compensation to loyalist whose property is the confiscated during the war, and on this point most of the other american negotiators are okay with it adams and john jay that when gen franklin will not give in on this point and he says if you grant compensation i'm not going to sign the treaty. we have to keep on fighting the war. so if you want the reverse, you know, and it anticipates his own leader access of sort of property related vengeance. he writes william out of his will leader and the two rarely ever meet again. and i think they do better and what i think about most is getting into the personality and t
around a number of states and spoke to a series of people in the u.s. senators to congressman to beat on the left and right, journalists, and tanks, to ordinary citizens. the same preclusion kept leaping out again and again. most americans don't realize how lucky they are. you know, the political institutions that define this country are in many cases unique in almost all cases talking about the term, the recall mechanism. the initiative and referendum ballots procedure. i'm talking about states rights. i'm talking about open primaries in a totally unique feature, but one that makes legislatures answerable to the rest of us. and above all i'm talking about almost everybody from the share to the school board. it's human nature to take for granted that which is familiar to us. but it's these institutions growing organically out of the constitution that is serve to keep your government and your people free. sometimes i say this and they say well, there are cultural difference is. we are naturally people who got away from the monarchies and closets of the old world. i'm afraid that explan
of independence, and i know that is what you mean but there is no one picture of the u.s. in 1775, because there are so many different united states, if you will and it isn't the u.s. yet, they have the colonies and they have distinct cultures and economies. >> was there a similar political mood across all 13 colonies, in 1775? >> here we get to the issue, how could they ever act together? i think they could act together because they had the same political assumptions and political values and, they had a common enemy. there is nothing like an enemy to pull diverse elements together. and to the extent britain had begun to, first of all, to try to tax the colonies, although they weren't represented in parliament, and then, when the colonies resisted, followed with others, yes, they pulled together and understood the interest of any one colony was the interest of others, and if they could -- if britain could get by, for example, destroying the assembly of new york, because it had resisted a... refused to supply british troops, if they could do that in new york they could do that in any other
that there is something more beyond the boundaries of the u.s.a., and it was a big world with a lot of people living out their who are affected by your decisions. >> host: gives a a more global perspective. >> guest: i think so. >> host: we're talking about your book, "the obamas: the untold story of an african family." we've been looking at president obama's lineage to his father side in africa come in kenya. that's the one thing to rest. you're not a birther. we are not discussing whether obama was born in hawaii or born in india. you think he was born quite clearly in hawaii. now, because there are people who claim that our birth certificates, all kinds of circulate on the internet. this is a kind of issue that doesn't seem to go away. so let's try to put to rest a bit. why do you say, why are you confident that obama was born in hawaii? >> guest: there's never been an issue in britain. basically let anybody become prime minister, it's not a big deal. you have to be nativeborn. but i understand the constitution you have to be born on american territory to become president. so that's why it's a big t
at a time of the peace negotiations at the end of the war and which benjamin franklin was one of the key u.s. negotiators. over the course of many months, the five peace negotiators are meeting in paris and hashing out all of the terms of the independence of the united states, and lots and lots of sticking points along the way that they resolve all of them until they get to one last one and the kind of fall of 1782i guess it is, and the sticking point concerns whether the u.s. is going to be made responsible for getting the compensation to loyalists whose property has been confiscated during the war. and on this point, you know, most of the other american negotiators are okay with it on adams and john but benjamin franklin will not give in on this point, and he says if you grant compensation, not going to sign the treaty. we have to keep on fighting the war. so if you want the reverse -- it anticipates his own leader acted sort of property related tensions. he largely rights will get out of the war leader and again they rarely ever meet again so i think the family to fight does matter and it
tomorrow. .. with u.s. comptroller general jean dodaro. it pinpointed 34 areas from defense and job training to social services and safety for federal agencies have redundant programs. this is two hours and ten minutes. >> good morning. the committee meeting will come to order. >> as is the new tradition of this committee, we will begin by reading the oversight mission statement. we exist to secure to fundamental principles. first, americans have a right to know their money washington spends and takes is well spent and second, americans deserve an efficient, effective government that works for them. our duty on the oversight and government reform committee is to protect these rights. our solemn responsibility is to hold government accountable to tax payers because taxpayers have a right to know what they get from their government. we will work tigers tirelessly with citizen watchdogs to deliver the facts to the american people and bring genuine reform to the federal bureaucracy. this is the mission of the oversight and government reform committee to read today's hearing is the secon
that there is something more beyond the boundaries of the u.s.a. and there is a big world with a lot of people living who are affected by decisions. >> host: it gives them a more global tears. we are talking about your book, "the obamas: the untold story of an african family." we have been looking at president obama's lineage through his father's side in africa and kenya. what's the one thing to rest. he ran not a further. we are not discussing whether obama was born in hawaii or kenya. you think he was born quite clearly in hawaii. now there are people with her certificate of all kinds circulating on the internet. this is an issue that doesn't seem to go away. so, let's put it to rest a little bit. why are you confident that obama was born in hawaii? >> guest: is not even an issue in britain. it's not a big deal. i understand constitutionally you have to be born an american territory to become president, so that's why it's a big thing. so i thought well, that's really have a close look and examine what the argument is. now, the first thing is he wasn't born in hawaii. and yet, the department of health h
to exchange u.s. debt for state that? >> guest: profoundly important. this went into effect. all of the unrest in the states was in part a response to the taxation of the 1780s where the states were trying to retire their revolutionary war debt by taxes on land, a multiple of what they had been before and the people were very rested but hamilton proposed a brilliant idea, that all the state debts would become a natural death. national debt. he would issue bondss on the united states. a 4% rather than 6%. and didn't have to pay the principal we believe. all you had to pay was the interest. you could do that on the revenue that was coming and on the imports plus some excise taxes and the unfortunate run on whiskey. if basically what he did was to relieve a component of their budget which was the majority what we were raising money for. when the state and loggerhead to pay off their revolutionary war debt they no longer had to impose these taxes and the country became much more peaceful. >> host: next call from john in dallas. >> i'm reading about the history of propaganda in america. stuart spea
on the american revolution, "liberty," are so wonderful. i use that in my high school u.s. history classes. >> guest: that's wonderful. >> host: and this tweet is from a middle school history teacher. it seems it is not possible to determine original intent. your thoughts, please, and that's from chris. >> guest: well, depends on what you mean by original intent. as i've said earlier, scalia said he is not interested in original intent, that is that he's not interested in what people meant to say which is very difficult to determine. but in what they say in the meaning of the words of a given statute. i think, i think that it is useful to look, for jurists to look at what either the drafters or the ratifiers said about given provisions of the constitution. there you can, i think, find information that is of use. there is no original intent, there is no original understanding of the constitution as a whole, but usually the questions are much more specific. and you can find some information, but i see no reason to think that we are bound to understand those or to continue the provisions, to
of american women who were -- who were wives working in the u.s. embassy in nairobi at the time. and for all his faults obama, sr., was a very charming man and he could charm the ladies. he clearly impressed he's women not only with his ambition and his determination but intelligence. and so it's actually through private meetings he's actually able to secure a place in hawaii and he actually flew quite independently of oboya's airlift with american women from the american embassy who actually funded his place and his air fare. you talk about the selma speech and, you know, president obama is a consummate politician and he gave this great speech, rousing speech in selma in which he referred his father came over from this great airlift in which he used it to somehow claim part of the camelot connection. and kennedy wasn't elected until the following year. he made an error. and he acknowledged the error immediately. his campaign team actually made public just a few days after selma that actually that was an error and, in fact, it wasn't correct. so he did correct himself even though he was, i g
. maier we have twitter.n fromit >> what was the significance of alexander hamilton's plan to exchange u.s. debt for the state that? >> guest: a profoundly important proposal. all of the unrest on the states was in part response to the taxation of the 1780s which they tried to retire they revolutionary war by the taxes on the way and that were a multiple before but it was a brilliant idea that they could have become national debt. those issuing bonds on the united states paid 4% instead of 6% and not have to take the principal offo immediately but just the interest. the revenue that was coming from the taxes on the imports plus the excise tax including the unfortunate one on whiskey, but he basically what he did was to relieve the states of ant o component of the budget which was the majority ofit whaty they were raising money for.oney when the state's head noio longern to have the taxes than the country became more peaceful. >> host: in the next call comes from dallas. >> caller: i am reading the history of propaganda in america by ewing and he speaks of a massive propaganda machine like
with commenting on recent comments that were made about fairness in the u.s. tax code even though it's not a tax code discussion. i want to clarify that i guess my definition of fairness isn't the same as what's described when 45% of the american people don't pay any income tax at all. the top tax bracts are paying 35% of their income and the top are paying 70% of all income tax. i disagree with that definition of fairness and i want to clarify that in the context of budg budg budg budgetary. the epa, this is a different direction than what has been taken so far. they have five education efforts in their recent congressional document talking about support and work and partnership with k-12 schools. federal and state agencies to establish priorities and leverage resources. lastly, an effort to increase promotion of green principles and increase the nation's scientific education. i would like to know if the department of education has been involved in those efforts through the e prngs a because it seems they should be talked about in education, not through epa. >> we had a good partnership with ad
's at the greatest risk. it's their immigration problem rather more than the uk. maybe the u.s. and uk would play a part. i think people who advocate armed humanitarian intervention need to think quite widely about the kind of coalition that would be put together. >> yes, you had a question in the back. >> i'm maria, i'm a postgraduate student at the african studies. i've been very much following what's been happening in the past month, being from the middle east myself as well, and of course, it's very interesting. and my question is on something that i've been thinking about is the definition of how al-jazeera is defining the professionalism, so to say. the western ethics of journalism, and i put western between two quotations. i wanted to know your upon about how al-jazeera is kind of playing with the idea of distance, the emotional distance. it's not like any other channel. when you watch specific, you can use egypt and libya and tunisia, and i you feel like you are part of the news. al-jazeera has redefined the concept of coverage in the last events. and the other question is what do you thi
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28